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AP Chemistry is a second-year chemistry course equivalent to a college-level, introductory chemistry course. Success in AP Chemistry comes largely from diligent, consistent study, practice, and questioning. Skills that will be developed include critical thinking, critical reading, laboratory design, problem-solving, note-taking, studying, laboratory technique, and test-taking so that students are well-prepared for the AP Chemistry exam on May 4th, 2015.

Page contents

News and current assignments

Schedule
External links
Files for students
Files for parents
Major Topics
Grading
Passing Rates



Schedule


This schedule should be fairly accurate in the short run (days to weeks), but gets to be very tentative on the scale of weeks to months.

APChem-schedule by Kurt Klein



Review work__
Review work will be entered as a test/project grade (and probably a homework or lab or participation grade, too) that is worth at least as much as a regular chapter test (and probably significantly more). Since most of the work is graded based on completion rather than accuracy, this represents an excellent opportunity for you to improve your grade.
Two items of special importance:
You have to be in class to receive all of the points, regardless of the reason for your absence. That is because we are going to do things in class every day until the AP exam that cannot be made up.
All of the review work is due BEFORE the AP exam. If your turn something in after the AP exam, even with a pass, even after an excused absence, it won't count. Plan accordingly.

Here is how the grade will be constructed (as of ):
20% Review sessions; 1 hour of review for each percent, consisting of 12 hours in class and 8 hours after school (1 "hour "= 45 minutes, a regular class period).
50% Practice exams and analysis; graded on the basis of completion, not score.
30% Homework assignments; graded on accuracy and completion, currently 10% for each of the three assignments.
The distribution of these points will likely change somewhat due to new assignments and other in-class activities, but I intend the ratios to stay similar.
Assignment 1:
Due, at the beginning of class.
Answer the 2006 #4 FRQ, but address ALL of the eight reactions. Read the FRQ instructions carefully - they are somewhat complicated and specific. DO NOT look at the scoring guide - solve the problems yourself.
In addition to the instructions for the FRQ, write a complete chemical equation (as opposed to just a net ionic reaction), including state symbols. Usually you have to write a complete equation before a net ionic equation anyway, and it is often easier to determine the reaction type from the complete chemical equation. Here is an example:
Write the reaction between hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide.
Complete equation: HCl(aq) + NaOH(aq) → H2O(l) + NaCl(aq) (notice I included state symbols)
Net ionic equation: H+ + OH- → H2O (notice I left out the state symbols per the FRQ instructions)
Next, classify each chemical reaction as one of the following general types (specify the type of exchange reaction if it is one of the two noted special types):
1.Synthesis (A + B → AB)
2.Decomposition (AB → A + B)
3.Combustion (organic compound + O2 → CO2 + H2O)
4.Hydrolysis (A- + H2O → HA + OH-)
5.Single displacement (also called "single replacement" or "substitution" or just "displacement") (A + BC → AC + B)
6.Exchange (also called "metathesis" or "double displacement" or "double replacement") (AB + CD → AD + BC)
Two important types of exchange reactions are:
◦ Precipitation (in a precipitation reaction, AB and CD are usually soluble salts and either AD or BC are solid precipates; you will have to use the solubility rules to determine which substance is the precipate)
◦ Acid-base (or "neutralization") (neutralizations can be reduced to H+ + OH- → H2O)
Identify which reactions are also redox reactions. Most often these will by synthesis (#1), decomposition (#2), combustion (#3), or single displacement (#5) reactions.
This website is helpful (as is Chapter 4 in your textbook): Types of chemical reactions

Assignment 2:
Due, at the beginning of class.
Make a concept map starting with "intermolecular forces" and "intramolecular forces". (What concept links these two ideas?)
You can use pen and paper or software. I highly recommend Coggle. You can login with your Google account, export images and outlines of your Coggle, and it's extremely easy to learn and use. No downloading required!
Your concept map needs 75 concepts for full credit. Any nontrivial additions beyond that will be extra credit. There is no need to label the lines between concepts.
Assignment 3A (2 points):
Due, at the beginning of class. I intend to grade it while you are taking a practice exam.
Draw a particle model view of the equilibrium reaction between acetic acid and water. Include a balanced chemical reaction (with state symbols) somewhere on your paper.
Draw a second particle model view of the same equilibrium system after sodium acetate crystals have been added. Hint: neither drawing will contain any solids.
You can use the document "particle_model_template.docx" as a template if you want to use Word for your drawings. If you just want to print the template on paper, then use "particle_model_template_for_printing.docx" and then make your drawings by hand. Word is a pain to use for things like this, so hand drawing would probably be easiest, but make sure all hand drawings are neat. The nice thing about the template is that the beaker images are embedded into the document and won't move around.
The files "file:particle_model_example.docx" and "particle_model_example.png" (which have the same content) show two different equilibrium systems in two different ways. On the left side of the page, both systems show individual atoms of the solid phase, whereas on the right the solid phase is represented as a generic lump, which is how you will probably see solids on the AP exam. The bottom right picture does not show the individual atoms making up the carbonate ion but rather one generic sphere representing the whole structure. That is fine, too, and much easier than drawing every atom (especially with things like acetic acid or more complex molecules).
How would the pH of the acetic acid solution be expected to change upon addition of the sodium acetate crystals? Explain.
Assignment 3B (2 points):
Starting with your acetic acid equilibrium solution, draw what would happen upon addition of a small amount of sodium hydroxide (so another before/after set of drawings). How would the addition of the sodium hydroxide affect the pH of the solution? Explain.
Assignment 3C (4 points):
Draw 4 particle models showing the main stages of titration of a weak acid (like acetic acid) and a strong base (like sodium hydroxide): before titration begins, after titration has begun but before the equivalence point has been reached, at the equivalence point, and at any time after the equivalence point has been reached.
Assignment 3D (10 points):
Due, at the beginning of class.
Ch.14 Exercises. Sketch the problems and briefly explain the correct answers: 14.1, 14.2, 14.6, 14.8, 14.15.
Ch.14 Exercises. Show work, including proper units: 14.34, 14.36, 14.115.
Ch.15 Exercises. Sketch the problems and briefly explain the correct answers: 15.3, 15.7 (instead of a sketch for this one, you can just write numbers), 15.8-11.
Ch.16 Exercises. Sketch the problems and briefly explain the correct answers: 16.2, 16.3, 16.8.**
Ch.17 Exercises. Sketch the problems and briefly explain the correct answers: 17.1, 17.4, 17.5, 17.6, 17.8.particle_model_template.docx
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particle_model_template_for_printing.docx
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particle_model_example.docx
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particle_model_example.png
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External links



Files for students
















Files for parents




Major Topics


  • Big Idea 1: The chemical elements are fundamental building materials of matter, and all matter can be understood in terms of arrangements of atoms. These atoms retain their identity in chemical reactions.

  • Big Idea 2: Chemical and physical properties of materials can be explained by the structure and the arrangement of atoms, ions, or molecules and the forces between them.

  • Big Idea 3: Changes in matter involve the rearrangement and/or reorganization of atoms and/or the transfer of electrons.

  • Big Idea 4: Rates of chemical reactions are determined by details of the molecular collisions.

  • Big Idea 5: The laws of thermodynamics describe the essential role of energy and explain and predict the direction of changes in matter.

  • Big Idea 6: Any bond or intermolecular attraction that can be formed can be broken. These two processes are in a dynamic competition, sensitive to initial conditions and external perturbations.

Grading


Overall grades are determined by the following types of assignments:
  • 45%: Tests, projects
  • 25%: Labs
  • 10%: Reading quizzes
  • 10%: Homework
  • 10%: Classroom participation
    • All students begin each week with an 80% in participation. If you do not participate, you will end the week with an 80%. Positive participation (asking a question, answering a question, helping me or another student, etc.) adds 5 points to your grade. Negative participation (interrupting me or another student, goofing around during labs, etc.), subtract 10 points from your grade.

Passing Rates


The following table shows the score breakdown for each student taking the College Board Exam since I've been teaching AP Chemistry. A score of 3 or higher is generally considered passing.

Number of students
Year
1
2
3
4
5
Total
% Passing
2012-2013
4
6
6
5
0
21
52.4
Cumulative
4
6
6
5
0
21
52.4